Even sumo deadlifters like Ben Pollack and Stefi Cohen say that they train and try to improve conventional in order to improve their sumo. The thing about sumo is that the lockout tends to be the most efficient portion while the start off the floor is the least advantageous position. The best thing to do is try both and see which feels more natural and smooth. Hip extension demands are nearly identical between the conventional and sumo deadlifts. So like, how the fuck do people hold the bar in sumos? There are several powerlifters who pull conventional in meets, in fact most of the 800+ pulls on record are conventional. It has to do with your levers. It depends what muscles are your strongest. I was asking if other people noticed that sumo deadlifts were easier to rep out given the same 1RM as a conventional deadlift. It does, however, require a great deal of flexibility in the groin area, namely the hip adductors. Is it to get stronger? Conventional and sumo use the same muscles (mainly posterior chain) though there is more recruitment of the quad during a sumo lift. In other words, stance width influences the ability to, say, deadlift 405 for 40 reps in under a minute, but not necessarily the maximum amount of weight someone can lift (in a general sense, though one variation will likely be stronger for you than the other). Many will argue that the sumo deadlift is “cheating” because it has a shorter range of motion (ROM). The site may not work properly if you don't, If you do not update your browser, we suggest you visit, Press J to jump to the feed. And i'm short overall lol. Your muscles have enough stored ATP and phosphocreatine to ensure that maximal outputs lasting shorter than 8-10 seconds won’t be limited by energy production. As in which deadlift should be used when targeting specific muscles etc. The comment that annoys the shit out of me is people saying that sumo deadlifts are way easier than conventional deadlifts. Was wondering about your thoughts on this! That's my understanding at least. The sumo deadlift is a legit deadlift variation. That's not to say my form is perfect every single time, but when it isn't, I notice it immediately. That depends on what you mean by “better.” In general, you’ll find that good deadlifters (both sumo and conventional) have 2 things in common: 1. Programs don't differentiate between sumo deadlifts and deadlifts, I find repping out sumo deadlifts easier, while in the lower/heavier rep ranges, its more true to the % of my 1RM. The sumo deadlift works the knee extending mucles through about half of their effective ROM, so it is seen as sorta-kinda a leg exercise. People will also argue that the sumo deadlift is easier because it allows your hips to stay closer to the bar. The sumo deadlift has a high specificity to powerlifting if and only if the lifter uses the sumo style deadlift during competition. How wide apart they are depends on your height, but they will be … It’s time for the weekly sumo vs conventional debate! Poor mobility? The one that is better is going to be based on your morphology, New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast, Discussion of physical fitness/exercise goals and how they can be achieved, Looks like you're using new Reddit on an old browser. EDIT: I'll also add that you should take your goals into account here. I've been wondering this for awhile now - I know that there are lots of people who pull huge numbers in both conventional and sumo, but the people I see setting and breaking records like Yangsu Ren, Cailer Woolam and Stefi Cohen all pull sumo and have insane body weight to pull ratios. If I did 10 reps @ 75% of 1RM (305lbs), Sumo would be way easier. Longer torso? The difference in mechanical work would likely make a difference in a deadlift-for-reps challenge, but not when talking about a 1rm attempt. But this isn't necessarily a reason to avoid the sumo deadlift per say. The wide stance and positioning of the legs during the movement resemble more of … The sumo deadlift, a popular alternative, is characterized by a wider foot stance with the hands placed inside the … Hope this makes sense. When I train both, my sumo and conventional are nearly identical in numbers (my pb is the same in both, but I think I could have pulled a few more pounds conventional). I have long legs and long arms and I found sumo to be more comfortable. Then try out sumo and see if it is ideal for your proportions. Deciding whether you should use the sumo or conventional … The vast majority of people will have very similar numbers with each style, and will simply find one to be perhaps 5-10% stronger, again, based on anatomy. 10 reps on conventional and I feel like dying, 10 reps on sumo deadlift I still feel okay. Sumo Deadlift or Conventional Deadlift Can anyone shed some light on both of those deadlifts. Fixed it for ya The sumo deadlift has been shown to produce about 10% less stress upon the spinal extensors in comparison to the conventional style. To answer the question: No, sumo deadlifts cannot replace the squat as they are different exercises and target different muscles. Really? in my opinion, those with longer limbs and a shorter torso benefit more from sumo deadlifts. As we covered above, sumo deadlifts will develop your quad strength and conventional pulling is more hamstring dominant. /end greatest statement about sumo vs conventional ever. Sumo is slower to break off the floor and easier to finish out, while conventional is a bit easier off the floor and slower to lock out. SUMO DEADLIFT. Those that sumo benefits tend to be long legged, short torsoed, and/or short armed, and/or have poor mobility. It is certainly no secret that sumo pulls are less range of motion than conventional pulls, but that doesn't necessarily make them easier. S: https://www.strongerbyscience.com/should-you-deadlift-conventional-or-sumo/, conventional is a little easier on your quads, sumo is a little easier on your back. This causes the conventional deadlift to have a more horizontal trunk angle during the setup than the other forms of the deadlift. Instead of being about hip-width apart, with sumo the feet are positioned wider than your hands. Sumo is slower to break off the floor and easier to finish out, while conventional is a bit easier off the floor and slower to lock out. Maybe I do need to switch it up. Should you Deadlift Conventional or Sumo? Just like squatting with a wider stance or benching with a wider grip is less range of motion, it doesn't mean it is automatically an easier lift. I definitely have 3 of the 4 (my torso is not particularly short). The individual may have some trouble doing the conventional deadlift … Because they are easier on your lower back, sumo deadlifts may be a better choice for tall lifters and those with a history of lower back pain. Deadlift vs. Romanian Deadlift: Benefits of Each and How to Do Medically reviewed by Daniel Bubnis, M.S., NASM-CPT, NASE Level II-CSS — Written … 2) Sumo Deadlift Form. Sumo is slower to break off the floor and easier to finish out, while conventional is a bit easier off the floor and slower to lock out. The conventional DL works the legs through only a tiny, tiny percentage of their effective range of motion, so it is traditionally not seen as a leg exercise at all. And this should, theoretically, result in greater muscle and strength gains. Sumo is a safer lift, not so hard on the back. Shorter arms, shorter femurs and longer torso - you will likely be better at sumo. Even the grindiest deadlift is usually locked out within 10 seconds. Pulling sumo uses the quads and adductors to a greater extent than conventional but also requires above average adductor flexibility. Use the 1rm of the style you are going to be doing to calculate your workouts. edit: The reason I ask this is cause I was wondering what that implications were for the many powerlifting programs that base the lifts by a certain % of your 1RM. I believe people should do whichever they feel they are strongest at. Yes. One is not easier than the other (ie., sumo is not cheating and is no easier than conventional), and thus exposure to one movement will not mean amplified output in another (or even equal output for that matter). It pretty well depends on your basic body type, along with some other factors. Also, sumo is more technical in the way you incorporate your legs and the lockout, taking more time to learn and be efficient with than conventional. If I film myself pulling, what I see with my sumo pull matches pretty well with how it felt before watching the video. once i started to do sumo squats i noticed how the inner part of the leg started to develop more. If you've always lifted conventional, you shouldn't expect your first session pulling sumo to be anywhere near on par with your conventional pull simply because you haven't had as much practice with the technique and haven't developed the muscles specific to the sumo pull. If a sumo stance doesn’t work, if even a horizontal deadlift in a sumo-like position doesn’t work, it’s basically always because 1) the person is trying to go too wide or 2) the person just isn’t built to deadlift. My legs are better equipped for reps than my lower back. If you don't want to max I would at least add some weight on your sumo days or rep out over your prescribed reps. Why sumo 305x10 if you can hit 305x15? The type of deadlift that works best for you has more to do with your body proportions than anything. To echo the above comment, the answers to all of these questions will depend entirely on your body and will vary from person to person. Most likely, that will just come down to leverages, as it usually is a bit easier for a 52kg female to get into position for a sumo deadlift than a 120+kg man. I'll add that there are other differences than just numbers. I used to deadlift in a conventional stance, then made the switch over to sumo after finding out how much easier it is for me. The conventional deadlift is better for those with strong glutes, hamstrings, and lower back muscles. Longer arms? But would a person with the biomechanics for sumo have the potential to outlift someone in the same weight class pulling conventional even with all other factors equal? However, I found that I have better proprioception with sumo. It may also feel easier for some lifters. The sumo deadlift can be used as a regression for the conventional deadlifts and/or assist beginner lifters in learning proper hip flexion and extension mechanics in the deadlift. You get more bang for your buck with conventional. They really just work different muscles. Anyone notice this? To determine which deadlift style will be best for you, just train both of them for a few months, and stick with the one that’s the strongest and most comfortable with submaximal loads. This should be taken into account when learning the sumo deadlift. Also, Stefi Cohen is … So sumo deadlift is of greater benefit to the front squat and conventional will have a greater carryover to the bottom portion of the back squat. I find that good flexibility and good mobility to benefit a sumo deadlifter. Generally smaller lifters are stronger sumo and larger lifters prefer conventional. Or would I potentially have a higher max in sumo assuming I trained sumo and conventional equally? If there is any correlation, it has been shown that lower weight classes lifters tend to prefer sumo, especially women, and higher weight class lifters tend to prefer conventional. It's entirely dependent on how you're built. Once I realized this I decided to focus on sumo for numbers while sprinkling in some lower weight conventional pulls as an accessory. If you’ve never tried it, then I’d better not hear you dismissing it. But How? If you've got long arms, femurs and a short torso then I think you're going to kick ass either way. I've always found sumo to be much easier to break off the floor... A shorter range of motion in the sumo means that you will expend less energy doing higher rep sets (>5) though a max effort pull will be just as difficult. If that were the fact, why are there more 900 conventional deadlifts than sumo, why is the top 3 highest daedlifts done conventional. This article isn’t intended to claim one is better than the other in terms of back strength or record legitimacy. The sumo is very similar to the conventional deadlift; however, the foot stance and grip is different. Some people will have terrible sumo pulls and great conventional, and vice versa. I'm not sure whether you're repping with touch and go reps or not, but if you are, then the hardest portion of sumo (breaking floor) is nullified by the bounce off the floor and youre left with whats essentially a top half pull. /s. Maybe the reps are easier because you are lifting more with your quads in a sumo and less with your lower back. Let’s get into the mechanics of conventional vs. sumo to see what the actual trade-offs are. The reason is that if I squat twice a week and pull sumo twice a week, it destroys my hips to where they can't recover adequately. Is it to break weight off the ground in a way that conforms to powerlifting standards? When I first took up powerlifting four decades ago, I was working hard on my deadlift and it seemed to be stalled out at 345 lb. There are several powerlifters who pull conventional in meets, in fact most of the 800+ pulls on record are conventional. I agree with everything you said. Shorter legs? To be fair to the sumo deadlift, the wide stance with toes pointed out probably involves the adductor musculature to … This puts less strain on the back. Everyone keeps saying that it depends on your body type, but no one has explained what those body types are. What do sumo deadlifts do. This makes pulling reps easier (for most people I know) than conventional (where a touch and go rep leaves you with the hard part of the pull to complete), New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast, More posts from the powerlifting community, A subreddit for the sport of powerlifting, Press J to jump to the feed. For simplicity, I will only analyze the lower body portion. In fact, it’s a better option than the conventional deadlift for many who have yet to experience it. They really just work different muscles. I think what you're describing is dependent on the individual. Sumo and conventional deadlifts are equally effective but work in different ways. Its difficult to say whether one is more impressive than the … There's definitely less lee-way to grind out a 1RM on sumo though. But the last time I did I tied my conventional PR. Think about it. Choosing between the two depends on your training goals, experience, and personal preferences. I have long femurs, a short torso, and long arms. Most maximal deadlifts take 5 seconds or less to complete. That said, a sumo deadlift done right is significantly more technical of a lift than a conventional deadlift. I'm definitely using my sumo max, I will experiment with adding a bit more weight to my prescribed weight/rep scheme from the program Im doing, thank you! Save the sumo versus conventional deadlift debate for the comments section. It depends on the lifter’s leverages. Sumo Deadlift The Distribution Of World Records The most obvious point that no one seems to talk about is the distribution of world records that … The sumo deadlift engages the quads and glutes to a greater extent than standard deadlifts. Your hip structure will impact your strength and comfort in the conventional and sumo deadlift much more than factors like height and limb lengths. When you say way easier it makes me think you are using your conventional max for your sumo work when your sumo max is actually the higher of the two. I would suggest going in completely fresh sometime and working up to a new sumo max (unless its a grip issue and you don't use chalk or straps). Contrary to popular belief, the sumo deadlift is not easier than the conventional deadlift from a biomechanical perspective Although the lockout tends to be easier sumo, it can be incredibly difficult to break the initial inertia on the bar off the floor. The conventional deadlift has 25-40% more range of motion than a sumo deadlift. If that style is weaker with maximal loads, then it’s easy to identify the specific weakness that’s holding you back. (This is assuming technique/form for both stances are good). Sumo is very technique driven, harder to master, alot more hip and leg strength involved.....I do both lifts equally. With conventional, it's not uncommon for a pull to feel good, but when I watch the video, I realize that my form was shit. Break out the boxing gloves! 4-Sumo Deadlifts Hit the Quads and Glutes a Little Better! There are no factors that make either the conventional or the sumo deadlift inherently easier or harder. Technically a sumo deadlift is “easier” because the range of motion is shorter, but the range of motion that is eliminated is the top. Or again, is it all dependent on your physiology? Sumo deadlifts are performed with a wide stance which targets the quads and glutes a little better than a normal deadlift. The main difference between the sumo and the conventional deadlift is the position of the feet and hands. A shorter range of motion in the sumo means that you will expend less energy doing higher rep sets (>5) though a max effort pull will be just as difficult. The conventional deadlift, on the other hand, like the low bar squat, makes use of an initially elongated hamstring that better contributes to hip extension than the sumo deadlift. I personally feel much more comfortable with the sumo, though I can lift the same amount of weight with the conventional. If your goal is to be like any of the lifters you mentioned, you should specialize in whichever one your stronger in. That being said, I'm significantly stronger at conventional (even reps), so I think it depends on the person. in my experience, they recruit different parts. But if the question is which kind of deadlift should you be doing, then we have do dig a little deeper. Hope that's not confusing, after seeing those lifters putting up huge numbers this year I got really curious. Note that you should practice with each for a little while before assessing this. The conventional deadlift versus the sumo deadlift is one of the great debates in the strength sports. I'd like to know if I should consider learning sumo. While no studies support this, it is true that sumo deadlifts require more flexibility than conventional deadlifts. As you may have been able to tell, the stance way more likely to give people issues is conventional. Also, sumo is more technical in the way you incorporate your legs and the lockout, taking more time to learn and be efficient with than conventional. Strongman here, so I'm forced to conventional and have only pulled sumo heavy like... three times ever. The opposite is true when you pull conventional. If I did 5 reps @ 85% of 1RM (345lbs), Sumo would still be way easier. The stance involves feet being wide, toes and knees are pointing out, hands are inside knees, chest is upright and knees are slightly more bent than in a conventional deadlift. For that reason, the sumo deadlift is be more quad-dominant than its conventional counterpart, as well as less stressful to the joints and muscles surrounding the lumbar spine. As I said above, I focus on sumo, but incorporate conventional as an accessory, even though I'm more concerned with increasing my numbers than will being well rounded. The grip is on the unknurled part, it’s so slippery :(. As already noted, it’s not a question of safety, they’re just different. Has anyone noticed that conventional deadlifts seem much harder than sumo given that you're lifting the same % of your 1RM? What are your goals? I guess what I'm asking is, is there a greater potential for a higher strength to body weight ratio in sumo? If you want to be strong in both you have to train both. Absolutely. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts, https://www.strongerbyscience.com/should-you-deadlift-conventional-or-sumo/. I've noticed that deadlifting in a sumo stance is less taxing on my body than doing a conventional. It’s more a matter of individual strengths and weaknesses. I started doing sumo deadlifts to warmup for my conventional deadlifts, and eventually my sumo got stronger than my conventional (only took ~6 weeks or so, but I was pretty inexperienced during that time so it might be different for you). If you have a proportionately strong squat vs conventional deadlift, that's a clue that you might be better suited to something wider stance. You should also consider how each will fit into your overall training plans. Switching off between sumo and conventional allows me to train some form of deadlift twice a week and, in my experience, optimizes my progress. Oh man, I squat and deadlift 3pl8s. I never said sumo deadlifts were easier in that sense. Whether or not is sumo deadlift easier than conventional, in fact, the sumo stance offers individuals a much more varied and perhaps a better pulling approach when it comes to this deadlift. So what’s the moral of the story? 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